Pages Navigation Menu

Agretto Pasta with Burrata

Agretto Pasta with Burrata

Agretto  is an Italian spring green that is popular in Italy. Most people in the United States don’t know what agretto is or what it taste like. We’d describe agretto’s flavor profile a salty and refreshing. This sea like flavor makes it pairs well with seafood (salmon & clams). So be scared to add some fresh fish to this pasta. If you want to try agretto as a simple side, find this recipe on our blog. 

Agretto isn’t the largest mover so we grow it on a small scale in our gardens.  We’d rather grow some items on a small scale than not at all because:

  1. We enjoy seasonality in our own kitchen 🙂 
  2.  We are known to grow specialty Italian items
  3. Farmer loves to farm, weather it’s 1 plant or 1000 acres, we love watching plants grow Agretto Pasta

Print

Agretto & Burrata Pasta

Agretto/ Agretti, also known as Monk’s Beard, is an Italian spring green that is very popular in Tuscany. This strange plant resembled chives but don’t let that fool you, it taste nothing like chives. Agretto’s flavor profile is salty, marine-tasting, and slightly crisp, even after it’s been cooked. This simple pasta is a stand alone recipe but feel free to pair with seafood.

Ingredients

  • 1-2 bunches of agretto, wash and clean agretto by removing hard/ woody stems
  • 2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 clove of garlic, minced
  • 12 ounces of spaghetti
  • 8 ounces of fresh burrata
  • Salt & Pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Bring a large pot of water with olive oil & salt to boil for spaghetti as cook as directed on package or al dente. Drain the spaghetti, reserving a cup of starchy water.
  2. Heat olive oil in a pan and add agretto and garlic and saute.
  3. Add the spaghetti into the agretto pan, toss to dress the pasta, and salt & pepper to taste.  If it is too dry, add one or two tablespoons of the pasta cooking water at a time. Just before serving, tear the burrata with your hands and add it into the spaghetti, toss again and mangia.